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schools are poor people. that is the height of inequality. that is what i call it a civil rights issue. those people need choices. more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the school system. [applause] >> the secretary of state, as a member of the cabinet, [unintelligible] >> it has been a pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] the ultimate compliment. >> he made the point that ideas matter. it also matter in national security. america realized it could not win the cold war if it still had a scandalous segregation in the south. winning the civil rights battle at home was a precondition of winning the fight politically across the globe. i think looking from the outside there is the same danger now. when i go to china and i criticize them for their lack of democracy, they say but we are educating all our people. you did not do that in britain and america. when i had been in the middle east, and talk to people on the edge of radicalism, they say look at the protest in justices in your british and european and american nations.
the transition only under that coercion and duress. >> i think you are exactly right. this is an example of radical social change that happens under top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from topdown change. when that topdown change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
with the civil rights movement. i do not think that is appropriate. to make it equal with the civil rights with other minorities, i do not think that is right. i think marriage has been defined between a man and a woman to raise our children. we need to continue that, the country is really corroding in terms of morals and values. it will further deteriorated. i think this is a state's right to rule on this, not a supreme court ruling for all of the people. the people should have a voice in whether or not this is acceptable for them. host: that is the last call we will take on this. coming up, we will look at the november jobs report that came out yesterday. joining us for that discussion to talk about the numbers and give us some context is rick newman. we are going to focus on the state of health of the interim america. thomas frieden will be our guest. all weekend long, the history and literary life of albany, new york, capital city. our producers gathered about programming while they were there. there are traveling to state capital to feature history and literary life as he will see fro
important, as well as other civil and political rights. the ability of individuals to exercise rights and political -- rights of political participation, boating, speech, access to education on an equal basis, are important to getting at some of the underlying problems that create the conditions that we heard in this morning's program. the legal realm is another area in which it is important in some context, you are bringing a case, whether in a domestic court or an international forum, related to cyber, you want to know -- you want to know the definition, but i think focusing on it too much distracts us from other potential things. finally, another area in which a lot of the debate revulsed is in the area of act as a critic in activism -- is in the area of activism. whether rhetorically exaggerating the definition of slavery or minimizing the definition of slavery -- in many ways, it is quite right amiss -- in many ways, it is quite reminiscent of the term genocide. just as the trans-atlantic slave trade farm the image of slavery, the holocaust is the image that comes to the average
bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue civil rights with anybody in japan about the history. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead, to listen to the living, and to see that this does not happen again. >> in washington, he discusses the inspiration for his trip and his meetings with bomb survivors. >> several governors met with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as p
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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